Chapter XIII

William of Cushenstown  1760 - 1803

 

13.1  William in 1760

13.2  Mortgage - Surgolstown & Laurestown  23rd December 1760

13.2.1  Mortgage - Surgolstown & Laurestown  11th April l772

13.2.2  Lease - Surgolstown & Laurestown   18th April 1772

13.3  Lease - Primatstown  27th February 1761

13.4  Lease - Pranstown   2nd June 1761

13.5  Lease - Cushenstown  19th January 1762

13.5.1  Lease - Cushenstown  20th February 1762

13.5.2  Lease - Cushenstown  29th March 1771

13.5.3  Lease - Cushenstown  31st January 1783

13.5.4  Lease - Cushenstown  1st July 1784

13.5.5  William’s Marriages and Children

13.6  Rights of William’s Children   26th March 1783

13.6.1  Settlement on William’s Children   28th June 1786

13.6.2  Settlement on William’s Children   3rd July 1786

13.6.3  Lease - Cushenstown etc.  5th July 1786

13.6.4  Lease - Dublin House  10th January 1792

13.7  William’s Property at Lake Tay

13.7.1  Lease - Lake Tay   13th January 1784

13.7.2  Lease - Lake Tay  27th April 1785

13.7.3  Lease - Lake Tay  28th April 1785

13.7.4  Lease - Ballymaslowe  9th November 1788

13.8  Lease - Delgany   9th October 1790

13.8.1  Lease - Delgany  20th September 1798

13.9 Leases - Cushenstown

13.9.1  Lease - Cushenstown  10th March 1784

13.9.2  Lease - Cushenstown   16th July 1791

13.9.3  Lease - Cushenstown & Dunreigh  13th December 1791

13.9.4  Lease - Cushenstown, Kilmoon etc   11th March 1794

13.9.5  Lease – Cushenstown, Kilmoon etc  14th May 1795

13.10  Death of William of Delgany   c1803

 

13.1  William in 1760

William the eldest son of Thomas of Clounstown (3.4) and oldest grandson of Oliver of Cushenstown (7.1.1), was a farmer and at this time he had just over 2,500 statute acres, most of which was around Clounstown and Cushenstown. He was born about 1732 (11.4). In 1760 he was living at Cushenstown with his wife Charity (Ryder) whom he married in 1754 (7.17). They had six children:

1. Thomas the eldest son,

2. a second son whose name is not known and he probably died young

3. William

and three daughters:

1. Charity,

2. Ann, and

3. Frances.

By 1760 four or five of these children would have been born.

Before his marriage William was living at Clounstown with his parents. It was probably at the time of his marriage that he moved from Clounstown to Cushenstown; he was certainly at Cushenstown from 1759 to 1771. His father died in 1757 and his mother continued to live at Clounstown; with her were most of her unmarried children, some of whom could still be in their teens.

William, with his cousin John Molloy, was an executor of the will of Edward of Hightown who had just died (10.4), and he also became mildly involved in the court case of 1762 (10.5) concerning Oldtown and Enniscoffey.

13.2  Mortgage - Surgolstown & Laurestown  23rd December 1760

William Bomford of Cushionstown leases Surgolstown containing 125 plantation acres (203 statute) and Laurestown 80 plantation acres (130 statute) in Co Dublin to the Rev Robert Bligh of Ballyshall, Co Cork, (Dean of Elphin, died 1778), for £1,000 down payment.  (Book 209 Page 130 No 137813)

This mortgage was paid off eleven years later in 1772, the next entry.

13.2.1  Mortgage - Surgolstown & Laurestown  11th April l772

By mortgage William Bomford of Cushionstown, Co Meath, conveyed to the Reverend Robert Bligh, Dean of Elphin, for £1,000 and interest the lands of Surgolstown 125 plantation acres and Laurestown (written as Laurencetown} 80 plantation acres both in the Barony of Nethercross. Robert Bligh has now received £1,020.1.4 and so releases the lands to William Bomford.  (Book 285 Page 586 No 190677)

Then a week later,

13.2.2  Lease - Surgolstown & Laurestown   18th April 1772

William Bomford, formerly of Cushionstown and now of Laketay, Co Wicklow, leases to Francis Hopkins of Dublin City the lands of Surgolstown and Laurestown (acreage as above) in the Barony of Nethercross, Co Dublin, for the lives of:

On 7th February 1756 these lands were leased to William Bomford by the Most Reverend Father in God, late Arch Bishop of Dublin, Primate and Metropolitan of Ireland (Doctor Charles Cobbe, died in 1765, of Newbridge Donabate, Co Dublin, which he built in 1737. The house is now in the hands of Dublin County Council but the Cobbe family still live there occasionally).  (Book 291 Page 164 No 190678)

This is the last document concerning these lands, but in 1783 William’s children complain that he has unlawfully got rid of these lands and he must have done this during the ten years after 1772. The two townlands came to William in 1754 as part of Charity’s marriage settlement, and formed part of the trust set up for his children.

13.3  Lease - Primatstown  27th February 1761

Jane Bomford of Clownstown, widow and executor of Thomas Bomford late of Clownstown, (and mother of William Bomford), makes over to Hamilton and Richard Gorges of Kilbrew, Co Meath, for £90 per annum, 2/3rd parts of the land of Primatstown formerly belonging to Oliver Bomford of Cushinstown, situated in the Manor of Killmoon, for 99 years.  (Book 208 Page 316 No 138567)

Although Primatstown is mostly north of the Ashbourne - Slane road, and Irishtown is south of the road, the two townlands have generally been linked together in the documents and shown as 559 statute acres. However, to reduce the rent by £90, about 300 acres must have been returned to the Head Landlord, Richard Gorges of Kilbrew. It therefore looks as though Irishtown has again been linked with Primatestown even though it has not been entered as such.

There is no further documentation on either Primatstown or Irishtown so it is not known what happened to the other 250 or so acres.

Kilbrew was the residence of the Gorges family. The early leases of 1712 and 1724 concern the father, Lieutenant General Richard Gorges who died in 1728. His son Richard inherited and died in 1778. It is not known who Hamilton Gorges is. Early in the 1800s John Howard Gorges had inherited and he, or his son, Major John Arthur Howard Gorges of the Bengal Army, 57th Regiment of Native Infantry, sold the place before 1838 to W. Murphy of Dublin. They moved to Boyle in Co Roscommon. In 1838 Lewis states of Kilbrew, “it is a fine mansion with an extensive and richly planted demesne”.

13.4  Lease - Pranstown   2nd June 1761

Jane Bomford, widow of Thomas Bomford the elder, late of Clownstown, Gent, deceased,

John Jones of Dublin and John Lowther of Staffordstown, Co Meath, both named in the will of Thomas Bomford, deceased, and

William Bomford of Cushionstown, eldest son and heir of the said Thomas Bomford,

all these on the one part lease to William White, merchant of the City of Dublin, the land of Pranstown containing 230 plantation acres (373 statute) in the Barony of Skreen for three lives, those of:

(Book 209 Page 578 No 139608)

Concerning those mentioned:

Pranstown is not mentioned again. We do not know when all the ‘lives’ died, but I am assuming that this lease was terminated c1790.

13.5  Lease - Cushenstown  19th January 1762

William Bomford of Cushinstown, Co Meath, leases to Robert Madden of Meadsbrook, Co Meath, part of the lands of Cushinstown containing 187 plantation acres (303 statute) along the west side of the high road from Duleek to Kilmoon in the Barony of Skreen for the lives of the said

for a rent of £154.5.6  (Book 214 Page 340 No 141416)

Frances Madden was William’s sister, so John Madden was his nephew (7.16). The Madden children (7.16.1) are all born by now, John of this deed now aged 4, Anne now aged 8 and the baby Robert aged 2. They lived across the road mentioned at Meadesbrook.

13.5.1  Lease - Cushenstown  20th February 1762

William Bomford of Cushinstown leases to Richard Bagnall of Hawkinstown in the Parish of Piercetown, Co Meath, 54 plantation acres (87 statute) of Cushinstown, bounded on the north by Hawkinstown, on the east by the great road from Drogheda to Ratoath, and south-west by that part of Cushinstown now occupied by William Bomford for three lives or 21 years at a rent of £36.15.4.  (Book 216 Page 118 No 142027)

These last two leases and that of 1728 confirms the site of Cushenstown House. It was next to Crossmacoole in the southwest corner of the townland. The house was demolished before 1836 but another was built which was called Crossmacoole House. The present two storey farm house looks as though it was built in the late l800s or early 1900s and must be on the site of William’s house.

Hawkinstown is the townland just north of Bodman and Crossmacoole, and Richard Bagnall died there in 1773 (probate).

13.5.2  Lease - Cushenstown  29th March 1771

William Bomford of Cushionstown, Co Meath, leases to Edward Semple of “Summer Hill, Co Dublin, Gent, the House, outhouses, offices, gardens and demesne lands of Cushinstown containing 111 acres plantation measure” (180 statute) in the Parish of Duleek, Barony of Skreen, for the life of Edward Semple or 31 years at a rent of £190.5.0.  (Book 300 Page 249 No 199594)

By April 1772 William moved to Lake Tay, Co Wicklow. This lease of Cushenstown House ends in 1802. In 1803 there is a document, which places William’s eldest son, Thomas, back in Cushenstown House, though it is uncertain if he actually lived there. Actually Edward Semple hands the house back early in 1783 but it is rented again the next year (see following deeds).

Even though the lease is to Edward Semple it is likely that George Shinton, William’s uncle, took the place when William moved to Lake Tay. George Shinton died at Cushenstown in 1780.

13.5.3  Lease - Cushenstown  31st January 1783

This deed of surrender is endorsed on the above deed. The endorsement is more or less as the 1771 deed but it includes the bounds:

Now Edward Semple surrenders all the above land to William Bomford, which he accepts.

Signed:  Edward Semple

Witnessed: Patrick Dowdall, farmer; and Robert Robinson of Dublin.  (Book 348 Page 480 No 234955)

13.5.4  Lease - Cushenstown  1st July 1784

William Bomford of Dublin leases to Patrick Dowdall of Garastown, Co Dublin, the house and lands of Cushionstown, Co Meath, for 31 years with a rent of £180.  (Book 378 Page 141 No 252380)

‘Garastown’ must be Garristown, a village l½ miles away and east of Meadesbrook.

13.5.5  William’s Marriages and Children

William’s first wife, Charity (Ryder) (7.17), died in March 1764 (Upton Papers). In the 10 years of her marriage she produced six children. Judging mainly from their marriage dates I suspect that the sequence of births would be as follows:

1. Charity, born about 1755, married about 1780 Richard Hinde of Dublin. They had an only daughter, Sarah Hinde.

2. Ann, born about 1757 married in September 1782 Francis Brunton of Dublin. They had three children: William, Harriet and Frances (17.2.6).

3. Thomas, born about 1759, eventually inherited Cushenstown when his father died in 1803. In 1806 or 1807 he married (17.2.1) but had no children.

4. Un-named second son, born about 1761, probably died young.

5. Frances Amelia, born 1763 (the only definite birth date), married sometime before 1783 (see following section) Benjamin Hinde of Dublin and later of Anglesea, England. It is possible that Benjamin and Richard Hinde were related, perhaps brothers. They had three sons and three daughters. Benjamin leased part of Cushenstown in 1783.

6. William, born in c1764, and died unmarried between 1795 and 1803.

On 24th January 1769 (ML) William married secondly Margaret Helen Watson. Betham records the marriage licence, “Bomford William of Cushinstown, Co Meath, Esq., and Margaret Watson of St Bridget Parish, Dublin, spinster. Directed to said parish 24th January 1769.”

Margaret Helen will appear again (17.2.3), but the Upton Papers add that she was of ‘South Carolina’ indicating that her parents had lived there and perhaps that she was born there, or had land in South Carolina. William had three more daughters by Margaret Helen.

13.6  Rights of William’s Children   26th March 1783

Between

the only daughters and younger children of William Bomford, of Cushionstown, Co Meath, and Charity Rider otherwise Bomford his wife:

1. Thomas Bomford, eldest son and heir of the above William and Charity.

2. Richard Hinde of Dublin City and Charity Hinde, otherwise Bomford his wife.

3. Francis Brunton of Dublin City and Ann Brunton, otherwise Bomford his wife.

4. Benjamin Hynde of Dublin City and Frances Hynde, otherwise Bomford his wife.

Reciting

1. The marriage settlement of 15th March 1754 (7.17) including a settlement of £500 on each child of the marriage.

2. The lease of 27th March 1719 (2.11) in which Hercules Rowley leased to Oliver Bomford the lands of Kilmoon 418 plantation acres (677 statute), Portlester 100 plantation acres (162 statute) and Bodman 69 plantation acres (112 statute), for perpetual renewal at a rent of £205.

Now Charity Rider is dead and William has married another wife and has “put Charity’s children out of the house”.

So the children listed above file a suit to ensure that they get all their rights. The suit also includes a clause concerning Surgoldstown and Laurestown (written Laurencetown) in Co Dublin, which William Bomford has disposed of, and “he had no right to do so”.  (Book 353 Page 179 No 237670)

It sounds as though there was no love lost between William’s married daughters and his second wife Margaret (Watson), or perhaps they were disturbed by the loss of the two Co Dublin townlands which William ‘had no right’ to get rid of. It must however be said that no existing deed actually states that these lands were put in trust; the other lands in Co Meath were put in trust to the two executors, Rev Michael Sandys and John Jones. On the other hand there is no previous record of the £500 for each child so there must be missing deeds.

It is doubtful if Margaret really put her married stepdaughters ‘out of the house’. At this time Margaret and William were living at Lake Tay and also perhaps in Dublin, and it would have to be a very large house to hold four married couples, at least one son and a few babies: one at least had been born by 1783.

Francis Brunton of Dublin has not been traced. There are five Brunton’s listed in the prerogative wills index; 1741 Antony, a Dublin merchant; three widows, Elizabeth (1733), Mary (1757) of Dublin, and Charity (1737) of Drogheda; and lastly William Brunton (1806), a tallow chandler of Dublin. Brunton is not a common name so all of these were probably relations of Ann Bomford’s husband, Francis Brunton.

It is not known how the money was raised but, as the following two documents of 1786 show, the settlement was paid.

It is interesting that the two younger sons were not included; the un-named second son has not been mentioned at all, which makes me think that he ‘died young’; the third son William is definitely alive. One possible reason for his exclusion is that he may still be a minor: if this is so then he is the youngest of the family and indeed his mother may have died giving birth to him.

13.6.1  Settlement on William’s Children   28th June 1786

Deed Poll made by William Bomford of Dublin.

On 6th March 1754 (should be 16th March) with the intermarriage of William Bomford and Charity Ryder, since deceased, the lands of Cushinstown, part of Kilmoon, and Bodman were settled on the issue.

Now William Bomford declares that he has carried out the above settlement.

Witnessed: Edward Stanley of Dublin, deceased; James Cummins of Dublin; and David Healy of Dublin, writing clerk  (Book 435 Page 21 No 278560)

13.6.2  Settlement on William’s Children   3rd July 1786

William Bomford of Dublin on his marriage to Charity Ryder assigned to the issue the lands of Cushinstown, part of Killmoon and Bodman. By the deed of 28th June 1786 (above) William Bomford makes provision in his lifetime for Richard Hinde of Dublin and Charity Hinde (Bomford) his wife, the eldest daughter of William Bomford.

Now he has given them the sum mentioned in the deed (the £500??).  John Warburton of Dublin and Charles Blake, apothecary of Dublin, appear as party to this deed (perhaps as trustees).  (Book 434 Page 157 No 280758)

13.6.3  Lease - Cushenstown etc.  5th July 1786

The parties

all lease to Ann Watson of Dublin, widow, the lands of Cushinstown and part of Killmoon 418 plantation acres (678 statute), Portlester 100 plantation acres (162 statute), and Bodman 69 plantation acres (112 statute) in the Barony’s of Skreen and Duleek.  (Book 437 Page 98 No 282032)

As pure conjecture one wonders whether Ann Watson was not some relative of Margaret Watson, William’s second wife; she could be her mother. In this respect Margaret’s second daughter was named Ann perhaps after her mother. Ann Watson was living in one of William’s Dublin houses as can be seen from the next deed.

Book 437 Page 98 No 202032 of 5 July 1786 concerns the same parties (Leonard Riley email 20 Feb 2009).

13.6.4  Lease - Dublin House  10th January 1792

William Bomford of Dublin leases to Ireland Birch of Dublin a house now occupied by Anne Watson on the east side of Cumberland Street. The house was built in 1779.  (Book 446 Page 42 No 287236)

13.7  William’s Property at Lake Tay

In March 1771 William leased Cushenstown House to Edward Semple and by April 1772 William was ‘formerly of Cushenstown and now of Laketay, Co Wicklow’. Unfortunately the initial lease of Laketay, or Lake Tay, has not been found, but we can pick up many of the threads from the following leases.

13.7.1  Lease - Lake Tay   13th January 1784

William Bomford of Dublin leases to John Ledsam of Dublin, Public Notary, the houses of Lake Tay and the land of Luggalow, part of Ballynastowe (the bounds are recorded) for three lives. Also the land of Elikirwan and Cloghogue, which William Bomford held on lease from James Shiel for 21 years adjoining Lake Tay, for 71 years at a rent of £9.  (Book 358 Page 150 No 239346)

13.7.2  Lease - Lake Tay  27th April 1785

Endorsement on the back of the (missing) deed dated 1st May 1764.

William Bomford of the City of Dublin leased to Mathew Millett of Dublin for £100 the house of Lake Tay and the lands of Luggallow, Co Wicklow, and the lands of Elikirwan and Cloghouge also in Co Wicklow, for the lives of His Majesty King George the Third and George Barker Nuttall or for 91 years.  (Book 368 Page 87 No 246083)

13.7.3  Lease - Lake Tay  28th April 1785

Reciting and confirming the lease of 13th January 1782 (really 1784) in which William Bomford of Dublin leased to John Ledsam, Public Notary of the City of Dublin, the house of Lake Tay, the meadows of Luggalow being part of Ballynastowe (Ballinastoe) in the Barony of Ballynacor (Ballinacor), Co Wicklow, at a rent of £51.  (Book 368 Page 88 No 246084)

13.7.4  Lease - Ballymaslowe  9th November 1788

Francis Erly and Hester his wife lease to William Bomford part of Ballymaslowe called the Rampark, containing 50 plantation acres (81 statute) in the Manor of Castlekevan, Co Wicklow, for three lives.  (Book 446 Page 42 No 287236)

Lake Tay is included in nearly all the tourist books on Ireland; it lies four miles northwest of Roundwood. Here is an early Victorian extract from Bartlett’s ‘Scenery of Ireland’:

The traveller comes suddenly upon the beautiful sheet of water called Luggelaw. It is encompassed on all sides, bowl-like, by mountains some of them of the wildest, and others of the richest and most pleasing character. (There follows a long description of a precipice with) a gigantic resemblance of a human face, looking gloomily on the lake below. Embosomed in a deep valley, which runs into the mountains at one end of the lake, stands a handsome mansion, belonging to the La Touches of Delgany, surrounded by rich meadows and luxuriant plantations.

Peter La Touche, of the wealthy Dublin banking family, discovered the valley and the Lake of Luggala in the heart of the Wicklow mountains, bought the land about 1790, and built a charming little house there in gingerbread Gothic, described at the time as a ‘cottage mansion’. It is not known what the houses were like which William Bomford leased, but they were certainly not of the standard of a ‘cottage mansion’.

The other properties mentioned are all in the Parish of Ballinastoe and are to the west of Lake Tay and Luggala, in the mountains. It was to these wild hills that the remnants of the Wexford rebels retreated after the Battle of Vinegar Hill in 1797 and, for a long time, under Joseph Holt kept up guerrilla warfare. It was in order to open up this area that the Military Road was built; it runs north-south through the Wicklow Mountains to the west of Lake Tay. Cloghoge is a house, which is on this military road, and Elikirwan is a little bit lower down on the Cloghoge Brook. I have not been able to discover where the Rampark is.

It is not known how long William stayed at Luggala, but it would appear that he also stayed in Dublin. In fact he was probably only at Luggala during the summer months since the whole area would be under snow in the winter. He moved to Delgany in 1790 and may well have been ousted from Luggala when Peter La Touche purchased the property.

13.8  Lease - Delgany   9th October 1790

Benjamin Keightley of Delgany, Co Wicklow, leased to William Bomford of Co Wicklow part of the lands of Delgany in his actual possession containing 34 plantation acres (55 statute) in the Barony of Rathdown, Co Wicklow, for the lives of :

or for 45 years at a rent of £104.7.6

Witnessed: John Bomford of Co Wicklow; Isaac Marsh, Gentleman of Dublin (Attorney, died 1796).  (Book 429 Page 106 No 277511 and Book 446 Page 42 No 287236)

John Bomford must be William’s brother who was living in Killincarrick on the coast just east of Delgany.

13.8.1  Lease - Delgany  20th September 1798

William Bomford of Delgany exchanged land with Peter La Touche about Delgany, Co Wicklow. About 30 acres plantation measure (49 statute) were involved in the exchange, for the lives of Benjamin Keightley of Delgany and John Keightley, brother of Benjamin.  (Book 514 Page 267 No 336332)

So William did have something to do with Peter La Touche who by now had built his cottage mansion at Luggala.

13.9 Leases - Cushenstown

Since William moved to Lake Tay and then to Delgany, his eldest son, Thomas, ran Cushenstown. Eventually Thomas inherits, but it is thought that before then he leases the land from his father. These leases formulate this idea.

Lease - Cushenstown   19th November 1783

Thomas Bomford of the City of Dublin leases to Benjamin Hinde of the City of Dublin that part of Cushenstown in the tenancy of Ann Bagenal, widow.  (Book 356 Page 120 No 238747)

Benjamin Hinde is the husband of Thomas’s youngest sister Frances; Ann Bagenal must be the wife of Richard Bagnall of Hawkinstown who leased 87 statute acres in 1762.

13.9.1  Lease - Cushenstown  10th March 1784

Thomas Bomford of Dublin made an agreement with Benjamin Hinde that on the death of William Bomford, father of Thomas Bomford, a long lease be made of the land of Cushinstown now occupied by Thomas Madden and also that part now occupied by Ann Bagnall, widow. The lease is now of three lives (they are not mentioned) at the same rent.  (Book 356 Page 309 No 240335)

This lease confirms that Cushenstown is still in the hands of William and all is leased to the following five families:

13.9.2  Lease - Cushenstown   16th July 1791

Thomas Bomford, eldest son of William Bomford of Cushinstown by Charity Ryder, otherwise Bomford his wife, with the agreement of his brothers and sisters (only Benjamin Hinde is mentioned), leases Cushenstown to George Tandy of Dublin.  (Book 440 Page 30 No 283581)

13.9.3  Lease - Cushenstown & Dunreigh  13th December 1791

William Bomford of Dublin leases to George Moss of Dunreigh, Co Meath, farmer, the lands of Dunreigh, and part of Cushinstown in his possession containing 47 plantation acres (76 statute), for 31 years at a rent of £54.6.2 Witnessed  John Bomford of Dublin (William’s brother).  (Book 445 Page 275 No 286740)

This is the first mention of Dunreigh, which joins Killeglan (Ashbourne) on the east. The townland is only 124 statute acres and is in the Parish of Donaghmore. It is not known when Dunreigh was first leased by the Bomfords, but it was before this date. This lease was due to expire in 1822 and probably was not renewed. Certainly there were no Bomfords listed in Dunreigh in 1836.

13.9.4  Lease - Cushenstown, Kilmoon etc   11th March 1794

Thomas Bomford, eldest son and heir of William Bomford of Cushenstown, Co Meath, but now of Delgany, Co Wicklow, and Charity Ryder, now Bomford his wife, leases to Joseph Rathborne of Ballymore, Co Meath, the land of Cushenstown and part of Kilmoon containing 418 plantation acres (677 statute) and Portlester 100 plantation acres (162 statute) and Bodman 69 plantation acres (112 statute).  (Book 481 Page 146 No 305871)

Joseph Rathborne married in 1774 Anne Madden, daughter of Robert Madden and Frances (Bomford), aunt of the Thomas Bomford of this lease; so Joseph and Thomas are first cousins.

Joseph Rathborne was the eldest son of William Rathborne of Dublin. He was educated at Trinity College to which he entered in 1763 and got his BA in 1768. From 1770 to 1772 he was sacrist, a sort of treasurer of a cathedral who looks after the silver and other movables like the books and music, to Clonfert Diocese. The previous sacrist from 1745 to 1770 was his uncle Richard Rathborne MA of Ballymore, Co Galway. I have not found a Ballymore in Meath, so Joseph’s Ballymore might be his uncle’s place in Galway, but the family settled near Drogheda initially so there may well be a Ballymore in Meath.  George Rathborne (email 8 Jun 2010) suggests Ballymore is a Ballymore House at Lagore, Ratoath, Co Meath, and it may have been given the name because of the connection with Ballymore in Galway.

13.9.5  Lease – Cushenstown, Kilmoon etc  14th May 1795

Thomas Bomford of Cushinstown, eldest son of William Bomford formerly of Cushinstown but now of Delgany, Co Wicklow, leases to Joseph Mayne of Dublin (attorney who died in 1807), the land of Cushinstown and part of Kilmoon 418 plantation acres (677 statute), Pollester (Portlester) 100 plantation acres (162 statute) and Bodman 69 plantation acres (112 statute) during the lives of:

It is this deed which names William as the third son of William, and brother to Thomas. He must have been fit and well to be made a ‘life’ in 1795, but he died within the next few years and before his father in 1803.

If William was the 3rd son then there was a 2nd son about whom we know nothing, not even his name. He probably died young.

13.10  Death of William of Delgany   c1803

No record has been found of the death of William Bomford of Cushenstown and later of Delgany, the grandson of Oliver of Cushenstown and the eldest son and heir of Thomas of Clounstown. However it was most probably in early 1803: in November of that year his surviving children drew up new leases (17.2). [17.2.7 says William died in January 1803.]

His second wife, Margaret (Watson) survived him. Her will was dated 1st September 1813 so she probably did not die until 1814 at the earliest.

Next Chapter: Chapter 14

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